Category: Education

Please… No More

Please… No More Professional Development if you are going to do it the way it has always been done.

Please…

  1. Do not read to me, I can read.
  2. Do not pull out a Popsicle stick and ask me for the answer you want, I do not perform on command. And, you might not want to hear my analytical assessment of answers beyond your limited question. I am a thinker not a fill in the blanker.
  3. Do not ask me to join a group of other people, that is not my learning style. Adapt your style to me. That’s what most of us have to do for the kids we teach.
  4. Do not assume one size fits all. I am not your size and you have not stopped long enough to know me or figure out my size.
  5. Do not speak so fast that you have to cover all the material you think you have to cover, I have digital tools, send me a link to your material. I will continue to learn well beyond your prefab session. Remember, it is what you say, not how much you say.
  6. Do not hand out paper copies only, I have digital tools, send me a link to your material. My learning goes well beyond your simulated speech.
  7. Do not tell me to put up my digital tools so I can focus on you,  I use digital tools to focus on you.
  8. Do not assume that “seat time” is the same as comprehension. I can sit in your session, but that does not mean that I comprehend what you want me to.
  9. Do not assume you know everything. I can Google faster than you can speak.
  10. Do not assume that the “I am bored out of my mind look on my face” is a statement of actual boredom. It may be and most likely is, but I think. I think about what you say. I think deeply about what others say. My mind delves deep into multiple subjects and is most likely outpacing your ability to keep up with my thinking.
  11. But most of all, Please, Please, Please…Do not treat me like an adolescent, I am an adult learner. And, I have been in the learning process for longer than many of you are old.

The Google Classroom/HTML File Assessment Challenge

Google Classroom can become a real challenge when it comes to assessing student work that is outside the normative Google ecosystem. When a student turns in a Google Document or any other Google created file, that is a no brainer, the system just works. But if you are teaching Computer Science and need students to turn in HTML files, that can be a challenge. The student can upload a HTML file, but the challenge begins with how is the Instructor going to read the file and assess the students work. Watch the video below for a simple solution.

Teaching Kids to Code

Just thinking out loud. Digital platforms give the mind an opportunity to explore, comprehend, and produce.

My take away from the Breakfast Television interview with Stefan Mischook on Teaching Kids to Code.

Coding is writing written directions to tell a computer what to do.

Two benefits to learning to code.

First, jobs. Coding is a skill set for a future career. Second, Brain skills. Even if a student does not pursue a career in coding, they will benefit by developing organizational skills, problem solving skills, collaboration (working with others), and developing a digital awareness.

ice_screenshot_20161104-122841

 

 

Coding Etymology

It’s not always about the code, it’s about the kids, it’s about the learning. It is about moving young minds beyond pop culture vernacular to an expanding vocabulary. I want young minds that can solve problems through analytical thinking. I want Etymologist’s, specialists in understanding where things came from and where they are headed. I want young thinkers who know the who, what, where, when, and how of stuff. Thinkers that know the history of vocabulary and thinkers who can envision the future of language.

And so the story goes,

Me: Did you just use the word ‘Awesome’.

Student: No Mr., I would never use that word. I use ‘lit’.

Me: With the use of ‘lit’ are you referring to the participle of light and all of it’s misinformed Urban Dictionary derivatives, or are you referring to the adjective that means ‘drunk’?

Student: Mr., I don’t know, I just like the word.

And that led to a seize the moment opportunity of research and replacement. Delving into the history of the word “awesome”, and looking for a suitable replacement that moved beyond the pop culture vernacular. We chose, prodigious. A word that means amazing or wonderful: very impressive according to Webster online. We clicked and clicked on the sound icon familiarizing our selves with the phonetics. We repeated the word over and over and then began using it in sentences. Spontaneous student participation with no hint of manipulated student participation tactics or techniques. It was response born in the lab of creation without any prompting.

Was this vocabulary day,  no. Was this a planned lesson, no. Was this written in the lesson plan, no. Were we writing lines of code in a code editor, no. We were engaging in spontaneous problem solving. Using our minds and technical tools to move beyond the ordinary to the extra ordinary. This was the intersection of experience and opportunity. The place where more learning accidents need to take place. The place of coding etymology.

prodigious

Just Thinking

I got to thinking about Computer Labs. I really do not like the term. Once upon a time you went to a computer lab to learn about computers. I prefer Learning Lab. A place where technology is available and learning on any subject can take place.

The journey into teaching coding also got me thinking. The typical lab layout is way to sterile. Rows of  tables all lined up where comfort and collaboration are hindered. I would like a lab more like a coffee shop. Relaxed atmosphere, computers not tethered to cables, variety of seating arrangements, adjustable lighting, and multiple large displays on the walls streaming a variety of tech related streaming video. Oh, and a barista bar for the instructor.

Crunchzilla

CodeZ

Parents need to know that Code Monster from Crunchzilla is a very simple computer-programming tutorial that uses live JavaScript. It’s intended to teach both kids and adults about the basic (and more complicated) things you can create using code. Lessons start simple and get increasingly complex, so kids of various ages can learn at their own levels. Kids can exit Code Monster and start again where they left off when they’re ready to come back, if they use the same computer (though Code Monster doesn’t use cookies to store information about previous visits). It’s not all about coding, though! As they figure out how to write code to make things happen, kids play around with concepts in math (such as geometry and fractals) and physics (such as velocity and acceleration).

 

Kahoot To You Too

Setting: Third Period

Me. Hello, how is your day going?

Student: Fine.

Me: What have you learned today?

Student: I don’t know.

Me: What did you have First Period?

Student: Science.

Me: What did you do?

Student: We used Kahoot!!!

Me: Great. What did you learn with Kahoot?

Student: I don’t know.

Reminder to self: It’s not about the tools, it is about the learning.

Coding For Everyone

What does it mean to be a coder today? The answer isn’t so simple. With technology as the backbone of our economy, everything from entrepreneurship to art galleries to medicine is affected by code. That means the ability to read and write code – even at a fundamental level – can not only make you a valuable team member, but can also help you communicate and better integrate your ideas into the final product.

From GA Blog